Sunday, September 23, 2012

Food Photography


Scone
F5.0 | 1/13s | ISO 400

The scone is a small British quick bread, traditionally hailing from Scotland. They are usually made of wheat, barley or oatmeal, with baking powder as leavening agent. The scone is a basic component of the cream tea or Devonshire tea. It is generally speaking similar to but different from  both tea cake and currant bun. The original scone was round and flat, usually the size of a medium size plate. It was made with unleavened oats and baked on a griddle, then cut into triangle-like quadrants for serving. Today, many would call the large round cake a bannock, and call the quadrants scones. In Scotland, the words are often used interchangeably. 

British scones are often lightly sweetened, but may also be savoury. They frequently include raisins, currants, cheese or dates. In Scotland and Ulster, savoury varieties of scone include soda scones, also known as soda farls, and potato scones, normally known as tattie scones, which resemble small, thin savoury pancakes made with potato flour. Potato scones are most commonly served fried in a full Scottish breakfast or an Ulster fry. The griddle scone (or "girdle scone" in Scots) is a variety of scone which is fried rather than baked. This usage is also common in New Zealand where scones, of all varieties, form an important part of the traditional cuisine.

Other common varieties include the dropped scone, or drop scone, like a pancake, after the method of dropping the batter onto the griddle or frying pan to cook it, and the lemonade scone, which is made with lemonade and cream instead of butter and milk. Also, there is the fruit scone or fruited scone, which contains currants, sultanas, peel and glace cherries, which is just like a plain round scone with the fruit kneaded into the dough. In some countries one may also encounter savoury varieties of scone which may contain or be topped with combinations of cheese, onion, bacon and etc.

Source Wikipedia

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